threesquarecats

threesquarecats i just repost things i find inspiring, interesting, educational, and inane.

wtfevolution:

"Hey, evolution, you seem like you’re feeling better. That’s a pretty red bug you’re making there.”
"Oh, thanks. It’s a flatid leaf bug."
"I like the shape. And that’s a lovely shade of red."
"I picked it myself."
"That’s a weird fuzzy branch it’s crawling on, though, huh?"
"What? No. Those are the babies."
"I’m sorry?"
"Babies. Dozens of creepy, squirmy, waxy, fringy babies.”
"… you are so weird.”
Source: Flickr / christophandre / licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (exposure adjusted from original)

Reblogged from wtfevolution

wtfevolution:

"Hey, evolution, you seem like you’re feeling better. That’s a pretty red bug you’re making there.”

"Oh, thanks. It’s a flatid leaf bug."

"I like the shape. And that’s a lovely shade of red."

"I picked it myself."

"That’s a weird fuzzy branch it’s crawling on, though, huh?"

"What? No. Those are the babies."

"I’m sorry?"

"Babies. Dozens of creepy, squirmy, waxy, fringy babies.”

"… you are so weird.”

Source: Flickr / christophandre / licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (exposure adjusted from original)

Reblogged from teded

teded:

View the TED-Ed Lesson The past, present and future of the bubonic plague


The bubonic plague, which killed around 1/5 of the world’s population in the 14th century, is still around today — but it now claims only a few thousand lives each year. How did that number shrink so drastically? Sharon N. DeWitte investigates the causes and effects of the black death and explains how knowing this information can help us prepare for any future outbreaks of the disease.

Reblogged from makemelaughblog

"To be poor and be without trees, is to be the most starved human being in the world. To be poor and have trees, is to be completely rich in ways that money can never buy."

Reblogged from currentsinbiology

Clarissa Pinkola Estés, The Faithful Gardener: A Wise Tale About That Which Can Never Die (via currentsinbiology)

Reblogged from hellogiggles

rosalarian:

cubebreaker:

TurboRoo, a chihuahua born without its front legs, was given a 3D printed cart made by San Diego firm 3dyn so he could train to be a service dog for disabled children.

I think we could all use these pics today. Golly!

"Thinking is good. We encourage that sort of behavior around here."

Reblogged from mathprofessorquotes

Calculus professor. (via mathprofessorquotes)

"

Researchers at Oxford University’s Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine have developed software that can detect the risk for genetic disorders in children, such as Down and Treacher Collins syndromes, just by scanning old photographs of their family members.

More than 7,000 rare genetic disorders are known, and although each is unique, there is at least one common thread: 30 to 40 percent of them involve detectable abnormalities in the cranium and face. The Oxford project, called Clinical Face Phenotype Space, builds on this knowledge, melding machine learning and computer technology to scan family photos and cross-reference them with a database built from images of people with known genetic disorders.

The Clinical Face Phenotype Space recognizes faces in photographs regardless of a person’s pose or facial expression, image quality, lighting variations or other factors.

"

Reblogged from newsweek

Scanning Family Photos Can Reveal Rare Genetic Disorders (via newsweek)

Reblogged from currentsinbiology

currentsinbiology:

arbitrary-stag:

Tree roots winning their battle against concrete

Beautiful!

(Source: turecepcja)

Reblogged from atlasobscura

atlasobscura:

KELBURN CASTLE

-LARGS, SCOTLAND

Kelburn Castle in Scotland is a stately home whose original structure likely dates from before the 13th century. It is thought to be one of the oldest castles in Scotland to have been continuously occupied by the same family — the other being Dunvegan Castle — and its original Norman Keep (which was built primarily for defense rather than comfort) is now enclosed within a larger home that was completed around 1581.

Learn the story behind the mural at Atlas Obscura

"I think you know you’ve found someone special when you meet them for the first time, and it feels like you’re just picking up where you left off. You kind of look at them and think
‘Where the hell did you come from? Where the hell have you been?’"

Reblogged from starsandwildflowers

Caitlyn Siehl (via perfect)