threesquarecats

threesquarecats i just repost things i find inspiring, interesting, educational, and inane.

currentsinbiology:

Mitochondria may have once been energy parasites

"We believe this study has the potential to change the way we think about the event that led to mitochondria," said U.Va. biologist Martin Wu, the study’s lead author. "We are saying that the current theories — all claiming that the relationship between the bacteria and the host cell at the very beginning of the symbiosis was mutually beneficial — are likely wrong.
"Instead, we believe the relationship likely was antagonistic — that the bacteria were parasitic and only later became beneficial to the host cell by switching the direction of the ATP transport."

Zhang Wang, Martin Wu. Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite. PLOS ONE, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110685

Reblogged from currentsinbiology

currentsinbiology:

Mitochondria may have once been energy parasites

"We believe this study has the potential to change the way we think about the event that led to mitochondria," said U.Va. biologist Martin Wu, the study’s lead author. "We are saying that the current theories — all claiming that the relationship between the bacteria and the host cell at the very beginning of the symbiosis was mutually beneficial — are likely wrong.

"Instead, we believe the relationship likely was antagonistic — that the bacteria were parasitic and only later became beneficial to the host cell by switching the direction of the ATP transport."

Zhang Wang, Martin Wu. Phylogenomic Reconstruction Indicates Mitochondrial Ancestor Was an Energy Parasite. PLOS ONE, 2014 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110685

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

Reblogged from science-junkie

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

radivs:

Nova Scotia Fall by Cora Joshua

Reblogged from wonka51

radivs:

Nova Scotia Fall by Cora Joshua

Reblogged from wonka51

bnme4everkb:

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

Sir Nicholas Winton is a humanitarian who organized a rescue operation that saved the lives of 669 Jewish Czechoslovakia children from Nazi death camps, and brought them to the safety of Great Britain between the years 1938-1939.

After the war, his efforts remained unknown. But in 1988, Winton’s wife Grete found the scrapbook from 1939 with the complete list of children’s names and photos. Sir Nicholas Winton is sitting in an audience of Jewish Czechoslovakian people who he saved 50 years before.

WATCH FULL VIDEO HERE

This post gained more than 100,000 notes in over a day. One of the most powerful things I ever posted. 

W.O.W.

oupacademic:

Genomic sequencing indicates that the human genome shows every sign of having had a long past history of evolution, taking place partly by means of natural selection and partly by means of genetic drift. You can read this chapter from Genes: A Very Short Introduction free on VSI Online for a month.

Reblogged from oupacademic

oupacademic:

Genomic sequencing indicates that the human genome shows every sign of having had a long past history of evolution, taking place partly by means of natural selection and partly by means of genetic drift. You can read this chapter from Genes: A Very Short Introduction free on VSI Online for a month.

Reblogged from hellogiggles

(Source: mouse-y)

Reblogged from vintage-visuals

(Source: bobrossgifs)

georgetakei:

Do you miss the old ways?
Source: I Miss the ’90s

Reblogged from georgetakei

georgetakei:

Do you miss the old ways?

Source: I Miss the ’90s

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Lemur Leaf Frog
Rare daytime sighting of the critically endangered Agalychnis lemur
Photo by Nicolas Reusens (Madrid, Spain); La Paz Waterfall, Costa Rica

Reblogged from nprfreshair

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Lemur Leaf Frog

Rare daytime sighting of the critically endangered Agalychnis lemur

Photo by Nicolas Reusens (Madrid, Spain); La Paz Waterfall, Costa Rica

ri-science:

We made this animation for our December 2013 advent calendar - a journey through our chromosomes in 24 short films.
Watch the whole series here.

Reblogged from currentsinbiology

ri-science:

We made this animation for our December 2013 advent calendar - a journey through our chromosomes in 24 short films.

Watch the whole series here.